Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, & The Demise Of The Two-Party System


U.S. President George W. Bush meets with former Presidents and President-elect Obama in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington

I think it’s a worthwhile question to wonder why Hillary’s efforts to run for president are always threatened by someone with far more left-leaning, progressive ideas than her. There’s a real progressive movement in this country and many voices who are not represented by the political culture Hillary Clinton was raised in. While it’s way past time for the United States to elect a woman president, it may also be way past time for a change from the type of politics and politicking that Hillary Clinton represents.

Obama ran on a very progressive platform. Unfortunately, in my opinion, he surrounded himself with more centrist and conservative advisers and that, mixed with the rampant racism that allowed politicians to block him at every turn and the reality that his voting record as a senator was more centrist than progressive, resulted in someone who ended up more like Hillary Clinton in the end. But what Obama tapped into during his presidential run is still out there. If anything, it’s grown even stronger and is seeking a voice. Right now, Bernie Sanders is that voice. Hillary can never be that voice. No matter how much she struggles to paint herself as progressive or equally as liberal, she simply isn’t. My personal opinion, she should run on her strengths — of which she has many — for those who share her political leanings. Give them voice. But understand that what the people who vocally support Bernie Sanders right now do not want is Hillary. She is not their voice. This is an important distinction when we’re talking about government reflecting the people.

Continue reading “Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, & The Demise Of The Two-Party System”

Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, & The Demise Of The Two-Party System

A Response to Gloria Steinem’s Guardian Article on Hillary Clinton


4296

I’m not a supporter of Hillary’s from a political standpoint, but I think Gloria Steinem’s analysis of responses to Hillary in her The Guardian article “Why the White House needs Hillary Clinton” is spot on.

Where I disagree with her is in that I believe there was quite a bit of difference on the campaign trail between Hillary and Obama. In fact, one of the things someone said to me that summed up my disappointment in the first half of Obama’s presidency was “Obama got elected, but we got Hillary anyway.” Politically speaking, that is.

I think having a woman president would bring to the surface the misogyny in this country in a way even more revealing than what we see now, which is already astronomical. In the same way Obama’s presidency brought America’s racism even more front and center. While terrifying, it has allowed us to address it more directly, call it what it is, and start responding to the need for change even more aggressively. I believe a Hillary presidential win would do the same for opening up the conversation about misogyny even more and allowing us to genuinely start to address this issue seriously as a national conversation. It would also offer an opportunity for many women – those Steinem terms “Hillary-Haters” — to address and recognize the role they play in that national conversation and start the healing process. No small thing. 

Continue reading “A Response to Gloria Steinem’s Guardian Article on Hillary Clinton”

A Response to Gloria Steinem’s Guardian Article on Hillary Clinton