Where The Heck Are We? More Pics From The Hubble


slide_2627_36972_large“What resemble dainty butterfly wings are actually roiling cauldrons of gas heated to more than 36,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The gas is tearing across space at more than 600,000 miles an hour — fast enough to travel from Earth to the moon in 24 minutes!”

slide_2627_36973_large“These two images of a huge pillar of star birth demonstrate how observations taken in visible and in infrared light by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope reveal dramatically different and complementary views of an object.”

slide_2627_36974_large“NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope snapped this panoramic view of a colorful assortment of 100,000 stars residing in the crowded core of a giant star cluster.”

slide_2627_36975_large“The Hubble Space Telescope’s newly repaired Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) has peered nearly 5 billion light-years away to resolve intricate details in the galaxy cluster Abell 370.”

slide_2627_36976_large“This image of barred spiral galaxy NGC 6217 is the first image of a celestial object taken with the newly repaired Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope.”

Abell 370, Advanced Camera, butterfly, Hubble, infrared, NASA, NGC 6217, telescope, Where The Heck Are We?“Active Galaxy Markarian 817.”

hs-2009-18-a-large_web“Interacting Galaxies Group Arp 194.”

Picture 18“Interacting Spiral Galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2163.”

Picture 15“A clash among members of a famous galaxy quintet reveals an assortment of stars across a wide color range, from young, blue stars to aging, red stars. This portrait of Stephan’s Quintet, also known as Hickson Compact Group 92, was taken by the new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Stephan’s Quintet, as the name implies, is a group of five galaxies. The name, however, is a bit of a misnomer. Studies have shown that group member NGC 7320, at upper left, is actually a foreground galaxy about seven times closer to Earth than the rest of the group.”

Picture 17“Eta Carinae, one of the most massive stars in our Galaxy, suffered a giant outburst about 150 years ago, which make it one of the brightest stars in the southern sky.  The signature balloon-shaped clouds of gas blown from a pair of massive stars called Eta Carinae have tantalized astronomers for decades. Eta Carinae has a volatile temperament, prone to violent outbursts over the past 200 years.

Observations by the newly repaired Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope reveal some of the chemical elements that were ejected in the eruption seen in the middle of the 19th century.”

To learn more and to see more photos, visit the official Hubble Space Telescope site: http://www.hubblesite.org/

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Where The Heck Are We? More Pics From The Hubble

Mammal Love: Humpback Whale & Bottlenose Dolphin


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According to Lori Mazzuca of Kallua Kona, Hawaii who won First Place for this photo in the Mammals category of the National Wildlife Awards:

“I was observing a strange interaction between a pair of bottlenose dolphins and a humpback whale, when it became apparent that the two species were collaborating in some way. The dolphin was lying on a humpback whale’s head while it was slowly swimming along. Looking through my camera lens the stunt appeared to be orchestrated by mutual “agreement.” The whale very slowly—and vertically—lifted the dolphin into the air. I expected the dolphin to wriggle atop the humpback’s head to get off, but it just laid still and arched, trying to stay on top of the whale’s snout. In this frame the dolphin was beginning its slippery return to the sea. Once back in the ocean, the dolphin swiftly swam away with the other dolphin, leaping joyfully as if they had just scored a coup!”

Mazzuca took this picture with a Canon EOS 10D; 70-200mm lens with 1.4x extender; digital capture.

Mammal Love: Humpback Whale & Bottlenose Dolphin

Life.com Unveils Rare Color Photos Of Adolf Hitler


originalIt’s amazing how color can change perspective. I’m a lover of black and white photography, both in stills and cinema, but there is something undeniably “life-like” about seeing real-life individuals in color.

According to Life.com:

Between 1936 and 1945, German photographer Hugo Jaeger was granted unprecedented access to Adolf Hitler, traveling and chronicling, in color, the Fuhrer and his confidants at small gatherings, public events, and, quite often, in private moments. Here, and in several other galleries on LIFE, we now present never-before-published photographs from Jaeger’s astonishing — and chilling — collection.

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The Huffington Post goes on to detail the history of these astonishing photographs:

The Story:
Between 1936 and 1943, German photographer Hugo Jaeger was granted unprecedented access to Adolf Hitler, traveling and chronicling, in color, the Fuhrer and his confidants at small gatherings, public events, and, quite often, in private moments. Here, and in several other galleries on LIFE, we present never-before-published photographs from Jaeger’s astonishing — and chilling — collection.

Hugo Jaeger in 1970. Twenty-five years earlier, in 1945, when the Allies were making their final push toward Munich, Jaeger found himself face to face with six American soldiers in a small town west of the city. During a search of the house where Jaeger was staying, the Americans found the leather suitcase in which Jaeger had hidden thousands of his color negatives. He knew he would be arrested (or worse) if the Americans discovered his film and his close connection to Hitler. But what happened next astonished him.

Inside the suitcase that held the Hitler images, Jaeger had also placed a bottle of cognac. Happy with their find, the soldiers proceeded to shared the bottle with Jaeger and the owner of the house. The suitcase was forgotten.

After the Americans left, Jaeger packed the slides into 12 glass jars and buried them on the outskirts of town. In the years following the war, Jaeger occasionally returned to his multiple caches, digging them up, repacking, and reburying them. He finally retrieved the colllection
for good–2,000 transparencies, all of them, amazingly, still in good shape — and in 1965 sold them to LIFE.

Life.com offers several categories of photos:

Adolf Hitler: Up Close

Adolf Hitler’s Private World: A rare look inside Hitler’s apartment, what he saw each day, and how he lived.

Hitler’s Humble Beginnings: Chronicling Adolf Hitler’s Earliest Days

Adolf Hitler: Among the Crowds: The Fuhrer at Public Events

Life.com Unveils Rare Color Photos Of Adolf Hitler